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Android 4.4.2 update causes multiple gmail account confusion

December 13th, 2013 · No Comments

With the 4.4.2 Android adding multiple gmail accounts has changed and it seems to be causing confusion. Here’s how:

Open Settings > Add Account > Google > Then add in your other gmail account(s). 

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Improve Pen Accuracy on Microsoft Surface Pro

November 18th, 2013 · No Comments

This works on the Microsoft Surface Pro 1 or the Surface Pro 2. It’s helped me a LOT on my Surface Pro 2, may pen is far more accurate than it was. The 16 point calibration is just not enough. This is a 100 point calibration, and it’s well worth doing. Swipe in from the right, go to search, type CMD Open CMD (Command Prompt) and a black Windows will appear on your desktop with a flashing cursor Into the Command Prompt copy and paste the following:

 

tabcal lincal novalidate XGridPts=10,60,110,360,660,960,1260,1560,1860,1910 YGridPts=10,60,170,330,490,650,810,970,1020,1070

 

It will appear as one line, one command. Run that command by pressing enter and allowing the rights from the pop-up. This enters you into the calibration settings. Once your done your pen will be so much more accurate!

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How to Remove Google Chrome Extensions

November 15th, 2013 · No Comments

Removing Extensions from Google Chrome is different than removing Apps, see my previous post on removing those.

Removing Apps is even easier, here are the six steps needed:

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How to Remove Apps from Google Chrome

November 15th, 2013 · 1 Comment

When you log into Google Chrome and add Apps (or Extensions) they follow you around. Whenever you log into a new instance of Chrome, another PC at home or work or around a friends, those Apps then auto install into that Chrome.

This is a really annoying Chrome ‘feature’ as it’s not clear how to go about remove annoying Apps. Take Little Alchemy for example, forums are filled with people asking how to remove this App and no-one responding. This is how to uninstall Little Alchemy and other Apps in Google Chrome. Here are six easy to follow steps to remove these apps:

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About Me

November 14th, 2013 · No Comments

I finally got around to updating my about me page. Last had a one line update in 2007, but it had mostly stayed the same since 2005. It was pretty darn old as far as Internet time goes.

If you want a little more information on who is writing for CreationRobot then go take a look over here.

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My Author Website – MJCook.org

November 14th, 2013 · No Comments

One thing I do is write, I’ve written about 50 short stories and they are, mostly, collected over on my author website:

http://www.mjcook.org

The content is Sci-Fi, Fantasy, including cyberpunk, steampunk, urban fantasy and more! Go take a look, it’s all free to read right now.

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Well Now

November 14th, 2013 · No Comments

Here’s my website that won’t die :)

 

It’s survived all sorts of nonsense throughout the years and it just keeps on going. I don’t update much on here anymore as I use other tools for creative outlets. Mostly Social Media websites like Facebook and Tumblr, and to a much lesser extent Twitter.

I need to look into blending this website with my Facebook Posts, although I doubt I’ll do that with Tumblr as my Tumblr blog is highly NSFW.

I intend to post a few more personal bits on here too. Not many people I know personally actually know of or look at this website. That used to be different, but times change. This works for me as I can write personal bits here with no-one currently in my life reading them!

So, updates to come!

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World’s Weird Landscapes

May 31st, 2013 · No Comments

At first glance, California's Mono Lake seems eerily barren. Twisting limestone pinnacles, called tufa towers, line its shores, some reaching heights of over 30 feet. Tufa towers grow only underwater, but Los Angeles' diversion of Mono Lake's tributary streams beginning in 1941 exposed the gnarled formations. Mono Lake, which is at least 760,000 years old, has no outlet to the ocean, causing salt to accumulate and create harsh alkaline conditions. Yet, oddly enough, Mono Lake hosts a flourishing ecosystem based on tiny brine shrimp, which feed the more than 2 million migratory birds that nest there each year.

At first glance, California’s Mono Lake seems eerily barren. Twisting limestone pinnacles, called tufa towers, line its shores, some reaching heights of over 30 feet. Tufa towers grow only underwater, but Los Angeles’ diversion of Mono Lake’s tributary streams beginning in 1941 exposed the gnarled formations. Mono Lake, which is at least 760,000 years old, has no outlet to the ocean, causing salt to accumulate and create harsh alkaline conditions. Yet, oddly enough, Mono Lake hosts a flourishing ecosystem based on tiny brine shrimp, which feed the more than 2 million migratory birds that nest there each year.

Like Mono Lake 1,000 miles south, British Columbia's Spotted Lake is landlocked, resulting in salty, alkaline waters. Over the summer, much of the water dries, leaving behind a lava lamp pattern of mineral "spots" that can appear white, pale yellow, green, or blue, depending on their composition. These mini-islands consist mostly of magnesium sulfate, which crystallizes to form grayish walkways around and between the spots.

Like Mono Lake 1,000 miles south, British Columbia’s Spotted Lake is landlocked, resulting in salty, alkaline waters. Over the summer, much of the water dries, leaving behind a lava lamp pattern of mineral “spots” that can appear white, pale yellow, green, or blue, depending on their composition. These mini-islands consist mostly of magnesium sulfate, which crystallizes to form grayish walkways around and between the spots.

Years of erosion by vegetation and expanding ice carved Zhangjiajie National Park's narrow, terraced sandstone pillars, some of which climb over 650 feet. The park's steep cliffs and plunging gullies also make the perfect home for more than 100 vertebrate species, including scaly anteaters, giant salamanders, and sprightly rhesus monkeys. Meanwhile, the damp subtropical climate nourishes diverse, sometimes unusual, flora.

Years of erosion by vegetation and expanding ice carved Zhangjiajie National Park’s narrow, terraced sandstone pillars, some of which climb over 650 feet. The park’s steep cliffs and plunging gullies also make the perfect home for more than 100 vertebrate species, including scaly anteaters, giant salamanders, and sprightly rhesus monkeys. Meanwhile, the damp subtropical climate nourishes diverse, sometimes unusual, flora.

The smallest of Yellowstone's geyser basins, Midway Geyser Basin (also dubbed "Hell's Half Acre") actually contains two of the park's largest hydrothermal features: Grand Prismatic Spring and Excelsior Geyser, which dumps 4,000 gallons of water a minute into neighboring Firehole River. The spring's psychedelic coloration comes from pigmented bacteria in the surrounding microbial mats.

The smallest of Yellowstone’s geyser basins, Midway Geyser Basin (also dubbed “Hell’s Half Acre”) actually contains two of the park’s largest hydrothermal features: Grand Prismatic Spring and Excelsior Geyser, which dumps 4,000 gallons of water a minute into neighboring Firehole River. The spring’s psychedelic coloration comes from pigmented bacteria in the surrounding microbial mats.

Blood Falls' grisly appearance comes from its iron-laden waters, which rust when they come in contact with the air, reddening the briny outflow as it trickles down Taylor Glacier onto ice-covered West Lake Bonney.

Blood Falls’ grisly appearance comes from its iron-laden waters, which rust when they come in contact with the air, reddening the briny outflow as it trickles down Taylor Glacier onto ice-covered West Lake Bonney.

According to geological studies, the Giant's Causeway first formed as a lava plateau when molten rock erupted through fissures in the earth. During a period of intense volcanic activity about 50 to 60 million years ago, differences in the lava cooling rate caused the columns to form, while further weathering created circular formations nicknamed "giant's eyes."

According to geological studies, the Giant’s Causeway first formed as a lava plateau when molten rock erupted through fissures in the earth. During a period of intense volcanic activity about 50 to 60 million years ago, differences in the lava cooling rate caused the columns to form, while further weathering created circular formations nicknamed “giant’s eyes.”

Measuring up to 400 feet tall, the hills are made of limestone containing marine fossils dating back millions of years. The verdant grass that usually covers the hills turns a milky brown come dry season, giving the more than 1,200 mounds their famously delectable appearance - 'Chocolate Hills'.

Measuring up to 400 feet tall, the hills are made of limestone containing marine fossils dating back millions of years. The verdant grass that usually covers the hills turns a milky brown come dry season, giving the more than 1,200 mounds their famously delectable appearance – ‘Chocolate Hills’.

Named after the Hawaiian word for "spewing," the mythical home of the volcanic goddess Pele rises 4,190 feet from the southeastern part of the Big Island. One of the world's most active and perilous volcanoes, Kilauea has been erupting for more than three decades, fitfully coughing basaltic lava into the Pacific Ocean below.

Named after the Hawaiian word for “spewing,” the mythical home of the volcanic goddess Pele rises 4,190 feet from the southeastern part of the Big Island. One of the world’s most active and perilous volcanoes, Kilauea has been erupting for more than three decades, fitfully coughing basaltic lava into the Pacific Ocean below.

Spewing scalding water in all directions, the aptly named Fly Geyser sits about 10 miles from the site of Burning Man, the annual counterculture art festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. This geological curiosity was formed accidentally in 1916, when ranch owners drilled a well in the area. They hit water, all right—too bad it measured a piping 200 degrees. The drilling crew plugged the well, but the geothermal water seeped through, leaving behind calcium carbonate deposits that continue to accumulate, forming a 12-foot-high bulbous mound resembling a scoop of rainbow sherbet.

Spewing scalding water in all directions, the aptly named Fly Geyser sits about 10 miles from the site of Burning Man, the annual counterculture art festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. This geological curiosity was formed accidentally in 1916, when ranch owners drilled a well in the area. They hit water, all right—too bad it measured a piping 200 degrees. The drilling crew plugged the well, but the geothermal water seeped through, leaving behind calcium carbonate deposits that continue to accumulate, forming a 12-foot-high bulbous mound resembling a scoop of rainbow sherbet.

Lake Hillier sits like a giant punchbowl at the edge of Middle Island in Western Australia's Recherche Archipelago, surrounded by a thick forest of paperbark and eucalyptus trees. A slender strip of shore separates Lake Hillier from the predictably blue Southern Ocean, highlighting the lake's otherworldly appearance.

Lake Hillier sits like a giant punchbowl at the edge of Middle Island in Western Australia’s Recherche Archipelago, surrounded by a thick forest of paperbark and eucalyptus trees. A slender strip of shore separates Lake Hillier from the predictably blue Southern Ocean, highlighting the lake’s otherworldly appearance.

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